treatment Tag

The evolution of medicine has brought with it higher life expectancy and reduced disease susceptibility. Human beings are safer from diseases now more than ever before. The advent of innovative technology in the form of vaccines and fresh research means that the difference in conditions between now and a hundred years ago is itself stark. In fact, around 1919, the Spanish Flu had broken out...

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Food, water, and medicines are a few necessities without which human life is almost impossible to maintain. In a world infested with disease, where garbage is piled on every second street corner, it is becoming increasingly hard to sustain an existence without medicines. Yet, where food and water are subsidised, nationalised, and available to the masses at cheap rates, prices of medicine and healthcare are...

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Supplemental oxygen therapy

Supplemental oxygen or otherwise known as oxygen therapy is the phenomenon where oxygen is used for medical treatments. This can include low blood oxygen, carbon monoxide toxicity, cluster headaches, and to maintain enough oxygen while inhaled anesthetics are given. Supplemental oxygen can be given in a number of ways including a nasal cannula, face mask, and inside a hyperbaric chamber. Presently, a handful of researchers at...

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Rehabilitation is the act of restoring something to its original state. The noun rehabilitation comes from the Latin prefix re-, meaning “again” and habitare, meaning “make fit.” When something falls into disrepair and needs to be restored to a better condition, it needs rehabilitation. People seek rehabilitation after an accident or surgery to restore their strength, or to learn to live without drugs or other...

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Studying experiences of disability in the US

Sari Altschuler, an assistant professor of English at Northeastern University, uncovers a history of the imagination in medicine in her first book, ‘The Medical Imagination’. She has been awarded a scholarship at Wellesley College’s Newhouse Center for the Humanities. The college will help her fully focus on her second book which will be titled- ‘Able: Disability and the Cultures of Citizenship in the Early United...

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Antibiotic resistance has been a growing public health concern. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), drug-resistant infections account for 2 million infections and lead to 23,000 deaths in the US and around 700,000 people worldwide per year.   According to Thomas Webster, a professor of Chemical Engineering at the Northeastern University, microscopic particles, manufactured by those antibiotic-resistant bacteria, could replace traditional antibiotics and provide a solution to the...

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Women's Clubs

For a very long time, women did not have any freedom and rights. In 1898, Jane Croly of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs wrote that women were able to reach out of their homes by themselves through religious institutions at first. As women started being involved in churches and charitable groups, this helped them to find companionship and facilitate change in communities.  Their groups...

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After the Paris terror attacks of November 2015, where 130 innocent lives were taken, few companies came through as a source of light in the darkness. In this situation of emergency, many cell phone network companies overlooked the service fees to let people communicate with their loved ones. For example, an act of kindness was shown by AirBnb as well when they asked their hosts...

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dementia

Dementia is one of those terrible conditions where the person spends all his life in absolute confusion. Imagine that you have no idea what you did yesterday. And to top it off, there is severe pain that you can’t put in words. For many people around the world, this has become nothing but a reality they have to face daily.   Alicia Bonner, who joined Northeastern University,...

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do-sound-waves-bring-smarter-medical-implants

Tommaso Melodia, a Northeastern Engineering professor is trying to develop miniature implantable devices that can sense and communicate via sound waves. Bionet Sonar, the director of Northeastern’s Institute for the wireless internet of things believes that the technology will be able to treat a broad range of ailments which includes diabetes, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and even heart conditions.   Whereas, the traditional pacemakers or any other wireless...

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