medicine Tag

medicine

The field of medicine has witnessed changes and developments for decades. But there are some medicines that survived the test of time and are still used today. Especially Ethnobotany, a scientific study of traditional plant knowledge, has given medicines like morphine, aspirin, ephedrine, etc.   John de la Parre, Northeastern University’s doctoral candidate described a new field called Ethnophytotechnology, which is the use of plant biotechnology to...

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antibiotics

In recent times, medicine has led to an increase in average life expectancy which was only around 36 at the end of the 1800s. Improving the quality of life is one of the key benefits of integrating innovations into medicine and antibiotics. New medical technologies have made it possible for individuals to spend less time at hospitals for recovery and leading a healthier lifestyle. The...

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Antibiotics are unique

The introduction of antibiotics into medicine revolutionised the way infectious diseases were treated. Between 1945 and 1972, average human life expectancy jumped by eight years, with antibiotics used to treat infections that were previously likely to kill patients. Today, antibiotics are one of the most common classes of drugs used in medicine and make possible many of the complex surgeries that have become routine around...

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Thomas Webster, a chemical engineering professor at Northeastern University, was recently elected as an Overseas Fellow to the Royal Society of Medicine, a UK based organisation that aims at improving science, practice, and organization of medicine. Websters lab at Northeastern University aims to develop medicine and technology at nano scale i.e. Nanotechnology. “If your system is not doing what it’s supposed to, it must be...

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Damilola Adetunla is a valedictorian at the Jeremiah E. Burke High School in Dorchester, Massachusetts, and receives a full scholarship at the Northeastern University. Young Adetunla heard incidents narrated by his grandmother. He remembers the story where she told him the traumatic story behind his cousin’s birth which led to the death of his aunt. The doctors made a nearly grave error in their diagnosis:...

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Opioid is a class of drug that includes the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone (OxyContin®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®), codeine, morphine, and many others. They are usually prescribed by doctors to treat persistent or severe pain.   They are used by people with chronic headaches and backaches, by patients recovering from surgery or experiencing severe pain...

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SCD

According to an article in the journal Circulation in the US, on average, a competitive athlete dies every three days from SCD, often due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an undetected congenital heart condition. It’s an abnormal thickening of muscles in the heart’s left lower chamber.   Gianmichel Corrado, head team physician at Northeastern University, leads a research team that is developing a new pre-participation screening practice to identify...

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Tying up blood vessels using the medical technology we have today is a highly tedious procedure, prone to error. It involves the surgeons manually tying up tubes that are lesser in diameter than hair follicles. The procedure could take up to hours and has the potential to be fatal. Many soldiers lose out their limbs because the military medicals do not have the equipment or...

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Breast Cancer

Tumours (lumps) can be benign or cancerous (malignant). Benign means it is not cancer. Benign tumours are made up of cells that are quite similar to normal cells. To start with, cancer cells stay within the body tissue from which they have developed – for example, the lining of the bladder or the breast ducts. Doctors call this superficial cancer growth or carcinoma in situ. The cancer...

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