150 years of the cosmic web

150 years of the cosmic web

The pattern of more than 80,000 stars within the Milky Way emit a peculiar variety of colours- blue, red, green, and orange, similar to a phone or computer ‘s screen. However, you can manipulate it with your fingertips or your mouse by expanding or diminishing it. This cosmic vision was presented by Nature- the eminent British Journal who asked researchers at Northeastern University to research on this by analysing, categorising, and eventually, visualising. The research at Northeastern University was directed by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi and Robert Grey Dodge, Professor of Network Science at Northeastern. They had come up with the visualisation of Nature’s vast catalogue which was arrayed like something seen through Hubble Telescope.

 

Subsequently, the breathtaking research revealed that every star on this map was linked to an article from Nature’s journal. The 150th-anniversary of science in cosmic web articles issue went online and the Northeastern visualisation focused majority on Nature’s articles. These articles were mainly colour -coded into 14 groups: blue for biomedical research, green for physics, orange for humanities, and so on. When blended together, the coloured point showed the interdisciplinary maps. With this, another creation of Barabasi Lab was contributed to the study which revealed that integration of these scientific disciplines leads to discoveries.

 

An analysis is done on Nature’s database that showed interdisciplinary disciplines are soiled off with each other. Alexander Gates, the associate researcher at the Barabasi Lab, revealed this analysis and said, “It’s this idea of standing on the shoulders of giants. This work doesn’t occur in a vacuum. It is built from a whole cascade of ideas.”

 

Moreover, Nature wanted to publish an article on the most dominant topics in the world like the 1985 research on the depletion of the ozone layer in Antarctica or the 1953 study of molecular structure. The Barabasi Lab constantly accompanied Nature from the past 150 years by publishing research that is done in this lab at Northeastern University. However, it does not immediately get published in Nature, they undergo various processes before getting approval from Nature.
The epicentre of this is obviously the relationship between different scientific disciplines that leave some traces of quest towards science, to explore more, and to brainstorm how these discoveries of science happened.

 

Shweta Tripathi

Shweta Tripathi
Shweta Tripathi

shwetatripathist262@gmail.com

Engineer. Columnist. Dancing and singing are my emotions. Fond of exploring new things.

No Comments

Post a Comment