Is extreme weather getting more extreme?

Is extreme weather getting more extreme?

Weather is what is taking place in the air around Earth. Rain and snow are a kind of weather so are sunny and fair days. The main things that cause our weather to change are heat, wind, and moisture cause changes in our weather. Heat comes from the sun. Places near the equator get more heat from the sun than places near the North and South Poles do. Land heats up quicker than oceans. Oceans hold heat longer, though, because land cools quicker than oceans do. This uneven heating and cooling of different parts of the Earth that cause winds. Winds move clouds from place to place. Clouds carry moisture that falls as rain or snow. Warm air can carry more moisture than cooler air can.

 

The term climate change is often used interchangeably with global warming. However, while overall global temperatures are warming, the effects of climate change are not limited to hotter temperatures. (In fact, some locations are forecasted to get cooler.) A historically destructive wildfire season plagued California, while heavy storms set July rainfall records on the east coast of the U.S. That’s not to mention the 2018′s hurricane season. Understanding the underlying statistics can help explain why all the repercussions of climate change can look so different. Floods are caused or amplified by both weather- and human-related factors. Major weather factors include heavy or prolonged precipitation, snowmelt, thunderstorms, storm surges from hurricanes, and ice or debris jams.

 

One of the most visible consequences of a warming world is an increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events. The National Climate Assessment finds that the number of heat waves, heavy downpours, and major hurricanes has increased in the United States, and the strength of these events has increased, too. Climate change is expected to worsen the frequency, intensity, and impacts of some types of extreme weather events. For example, sea level rise increases the impacts of coastal storms and warming can place more stress on water supplies during droughts. That’s why many cities, states, and businesses are taking steps to prepare for more extreme weather.
Northeastern University professor Auroop Ganguly, an expert in extreme weather and infrastructural resilience said,” Something needs to be done to boost preparedness for and recovery from weather catastrophes.” He further added, “When disaster strikes, the first and most important response is to triage: get people to safety, rescue those who became trapped, and then face the physical and emotional toll wrought by the disaster.”

 

Saloni Sharma

Saloni Sharma
Saloni Sharma

13salonisharma@gmail.com

Pursuing BTech in electrical engineering from SGSITS CAT aspirant Love to read and write

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